Leadership in Ministry: Employees vs. Entrepreneurs

Youth Pastor leader

Whether we like to admit it or not, a lot of times, the success of a ministry can be determined by the mentality of the minister. Sometimes our biggest problem is us and the way we’re thinking and the way we see ourselves.

If you’re in ministry, here’s what I want to challenge you to find out about yourself: Do you consider yourself to be an employee or an entrepreneur?

If you answer employee, you’ve just limited yourself to a ‘drone.’ Someone who obsesses with doing just enough. Someone who is focused on getting by and staying out of trouble. Realize, I’m not referring to an actual employee in the literal sense, because there are many great employees. I’m not saying that it’s wrong to submit to authority or be under someone’s leadership. However, I’m referring to it as a metaphorical position of a person’s mind and how they view themselves in the position God’s called them to be in. As a Minister of the Gospel, this mentality is a dangerous place to be in.

On the other hand, if you’re an entrepreneur, you’ll be willing to do whatever needs to be done in order to reach your goals. Your job will never be done because you’re wired to accomplish more than you’re accomplishing right now, and you want to experience more than you’re currently experiencing. If you are an entrepreneur, you’re driven and focused to take that next step, whatever that may be.

Entrepreneurs aren’t necessarily concerned with the glamorous. They’re willing to do what few others are willing to do in order to obtain the results that very few ever experience… even if the job requires you to get a little dirty.

Mike Rowe does a show called “Dirty Jobs.” He recently did a show with a Porta-Potty Technician who also happened to be a multi-millionaire. This guy realized at an early age that the human race is never going to say, “Look, we voted and we’ve decided we’re not going to poop anymore.” It’s never going to stop! So, when he thought about it, there was great job security in Porta-Pottys. Secondly, he understood that he wouldn’t really ever have to compete for his job. It’s not like there are a lot of people climbing a ladder to try and take his place if he’s cleaning and repairing portable poopers every day. So, not only did he decide to be a porta-potty technician, he decided that he was going to be the very best technician the porta-potty world had ever seen! This guy saw great potential in doing something that most people wouldn’t ever consider doing, and by doing it, he got to experience incredible success.

You see, he wasn’t an employee–he was an entrepreneur! He was willing to go above and beyond. He was willing to do what most people would never do. He didn’t do just enough, he was intentional and aggressive in pursuing something that most would try to avoid.

So the questions is… what about you? How would you classify yourself? How do you lead in your organization?

Are you just going to ‘follow-the-leader’ and ‘obey’ and ‘do what you need to do to keep your head above water’ and continue to see the same results over and over… or… are you going to take ownership of your ministry and do whatever it takes to accomplish to goals set by Christ?

Christianity is covered with ‘drone’ leadership. Yes men. Employees. Not just lazy people or apathetic individuals, but people that do just enough to stay on the payroll and out of trouble.

Just imagine the results the world would see if Ministers changed the mentality behind their methodology and ministries! Revival would cease to be an event that happened in the past and become a legitimate reality for our future.

When we become entrepreneurs, it creates an urgency and aggressiveness inside of us that forces us to be bolder in our efforts to reach people and communities for Christ. It forces us to be fishers of men. It forces us to be like Christ.

Which one will you be today?

 

Comments

  1. Marcus Byrd

    I enjoyed this post. I get what you are saying, but it did take me a minute. I really don’t see myself as an employee or entrepreneur just a volunteer, a servant. This is a thought provoking post, thanks for sharing.

  2. Marcus Byrd

    I enjoyed this post. I get what you are saying, but it did take me a minute. I really don’t see myself as an employee or entrepreneur just a volunteer, a servant. This is a thought provoking post, thanks for sharing.

  3. To bounce off Marcus’ comment, I think the premise for this discussion, that an employee at a church is “just a drone” is faulty. I would never tell a volunteer, “you are JUST a volunteer.” We are servants to the Lord and it just happens to be our profession to live out our calling and get paid for it.

    That being said, I completely agree with the foundation of this article, we need to constantly shed the apathy that can grow upon us, push forward with creativity and energy, all the while serving with our whole heart for God.

  4. To bounce off Marcus’ comment, I think the premise for this discussion, that an employee at a church is “just a drone” is faulty. I would never tell a volunteer, “you are JUST a volunteer.” We are servants to the Lord and it just happens to be our profession to live out our calling and get paid for it.

    That being said, I completely agree with the foundation of this article, we need to constantly shed the apathy that can grow upon us, push forward with creativity and energy, all the while serving with our whole heart for God.

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